Plans for the future

Today Prime Minister Viktor Orbán has outlined a ten point action plan  statement of intent for the future… “provided we get a mandate from the Hungarian voters to do these”  Luckily they’ve got a fair chance for that. 🙂

The business conference where PM Orbán spoke

  1. Further increasing the domestic proportion of  Hungary’s public debt financing.
  2. Re-industrialization of Hungary to be continued. A bigger percentage of Hungary’s GDP must come from manufacturing than in the case of  the Czech Republic or even Germany.
  3. Further reorientation in Hungary’s foreign relations. He mentioned Turkey and India as examples which countries Hungary should be more focused on.
  4. Changing the ownership distribution in Hungary’s banking sector so that at least 50% of the banking section should be Hungarian-owned.
  5. 80 percents of agricultural land shall be owned by small and middle-sized farmers.
  6. Creating new innovation centres, with university partnerships.
  7. Further decreasing tax on labour and  shifting taxation on consumption even more.
  8. Economic policies must address Hungary’s demographic crisis and the whole economy must be viewed from this angle.
  9. New energy policy: non-profit energy distribution services. Both household energy bills and industrial energy bills shall be the cheapest in Europe and energy prices should be competitive with the ones in the USA.
  10. Full employment (when there is no cyclical or deficient-demand unemployment)

Ambitious goals indeed… But this guy means it and he’s been delivering on his promises.

Any comments?

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2 Comments

  1. Well, not so much an action plan as a statement of intent. I would like to know concretely what will be done, by whom and when! 8) is the most interesting one for me, as a parent and teacher I regard myself as on the front line of Hungary’s demographic decline. I’m glad Orbán recognizes the significance of the problem, but shouldn’t it be number 1)? The last year in particular has seen massive changes in my family’s circumstances, but I can’t really say that our life has become any better, and hence that family life is any more attractive to young Hungarians. Yes, our net income has shot up (teachers pay rise, tax credit tor three children families) but so have our expenses such as food and clothing through the VAT hike. But more significant is the amount of time and energy we can invest in our family. Because of the School reforms I’m now working longer hours and coming home more tired, and more homework has landed on our youngest child which now has to be supervised by my poor wife when she gets back from work. The problem behind demographic decline right across the developed world is the growth of families where both partners are working, It would probably be better for families to reduce the working hours of parents rather than give them tax breaks – but that of course would make employers even more reluctant to employ them in the first place. Perhaps paying subsidies to employers for employing parents is the way ahead?

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    • “Well, not so much an action plan as a statement of intent.”
      Yes, sorry, you are right. I’ll correct the wording in the post.

      “I would like to know concretely what will be done, by whom and when!”
      I’ll try to keep you posted on this. 🙂

      “shouldn’t the demographic crisis be number 1)”?
      Yes, I agree that it should be.

      “The problem behind demographic decline right across the developed world is the growth of families where both partners are working”
      That’s a good remark. (The other major factor is actually the welfare systems, particularly the state pension.) At the end of the day this all boils down to breaking the traditional family model…

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