Orbán’s lecture on the 27th Summer Open University in Transylvania

Thank you for Bill Still  for the English-subtitled video. Please check out his website.

The video starts playing where, as the first (and so far only?) incumbent leader in the world, he endorsed US Presidential Candidate Donald Trump.
However it’s highly recommended to watch the lecture in full!

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Happy 1016th birthday, Hungary!

It’s St. Stephen‘s day today.  As most readers would know, people celebrate their “nameday” in Central and Eastern Europe and this is the nameday of our founding king, St. Stephen I. There are all sort of programs today: concerts or

Augusztus 20. - Mesterségek ünnepe

the traditional Artisans’ Fair in Buda Castle

Then there will be the fireworks as well tonight, of course.

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From a political point of view,  cabinet minister János Lázár, Prime Minister Orbán’s right-hand man, delivered a remarkable speech this morning:

Hungary has never renounced her sovereignty. An independent Christian state is St. Stephen’s heritage. The European Union is not a many century old political union, it’s a pilot project.  Today’s unelected European leaders with zero legitimacy try to tweak the basic treaties of the EU in stealth mode to their liking.  The EU is stricken by financial crises, Brexit and the migration crisis.  Brussels tries to sweep the chief problem, that is the diminishing prestige of the EU and the uncontrolled millions knocking on the gates, under the carpet with their mandatory migrant quota idea. Hungary’s preserving her sovereignty serves the interests of the European community, too.

If needed then we’ll defend Europe even from herself. Hungary will not let down those European citizens who are dissatisfied with Brussels. It’s not the idea, it’s the practice of  the European Union what is wrong.

There will be an EU summit on the migration crisis and Brexit in the capital of V4 country Slovakia ( Pozsony, Bratislava) in September.  We live in interesting times.

Power is poison

Political power is poison.  More political power is more poison. It’s a little wonder that Fidesz and Prime Minister Viktor Orbán are not terminally ill yet.

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July, 2016: Most likely election results according to all political polls

If the elections were held in Hungary this Sunday then Fidesz would repeat, or actually improve, its 2014  result when they achieved a supermajority (that is two thirds of the seats) as they did in 2010.

One may daydream about a grassroot political force, about healthy competition in Hungary’s political life, but now there are simply no signs in Hungary for an electable alternative to Fidesz.  This is bad for Fidesz, this is bad for the country but it’s a lot, lot better than the prospect of a “left-liberal”, that is MSZP-DK-PM-LMP-Együtt government. Or of a Jobbik government.

 

 

Hungarian football returns

I spent a year as a student in England in the early 1990’s.  On the last day, when I was flying back to Hungary from London Heathrow, I had some time left to kill at the airport.  I went out for a walk and then I saw a homeless guy begging on the curb.  I dumped all my British small change on him, maybe a few pounds. The man was very grateful and, as he was happily chatting to me, he asked where I was from.  When he heard the answer, he started reciting “Puskás, Bozsik, Hidegkuti…”  I think that was really all he knew about Hungary.  I must admit I’ve never been a football fan but that made me think.

500px-golden_team_1953

The Hungarian national team played in a significant international event 44 years ago last time.  Still I, a non-fan of football,  was cheering madly at the TV like practically everybody else in Hungary, in the Hungarian communities of the Carpathian Basin or elsewhere in the world.

Full-time: Hungary 3-3 Portugal

The best match of the tournament comes to a close.

the Guardian reported.

There are significant political implications to this Phoenix-revival of Hungarian football.  Prime Minister Orbán is known to be a football maniac.  He was a professional football player, too. His left-liberal political enemies have been raging about that loads of  derelict football stadiums have been rebuilt in Hungary since 2010, to a large extent, from taxpayer’s money.  Orbán’s home village now hosts the world’s Number One upscale stadium:

The construction of the Pancho Arena in Felcsut was surrounded in controversy. Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban grew up in the village the stadium was built in and is known for his love of football so a lot of eyebrows were raised when Orban’s government passed a lot of legislation which helped the companies which built the stadium. Despite that and the fact that the stadium has a larger capacity than the village it is built in, the Pancho Arena is truly beautiful. Named after Hungarian and football legend Ferenc Puskas, the Pancho Arena was designed by Hungarian architect Imre Makovecz and opened in 2014. The wooden interior and lighting make for a truly beautiful place to play football.

The left-liberal press, politicians and supporters  practically used to be rooting against the Hungarian national team.  The most popular left-liberal newsportal (index.hu) wrote:

At the end of the day, each and every European Championship point (for the Hungarian national team) only vindicates Orbán’s elite. …

It’s a respectable position if somebody roots against the national team in 2016’s Hungary.

After the third fiesta like this,

 

 

now the “left-liberals” have to concede utter defeat. Today’s articles in the left-lib press go as if they were always very supportive of Hungarian football and our budding Golden Team.  😀

Though the Hungarian economy is doing quite well, now Mr. Orbán has even less to worry about the general elections in 2018.

Orbán on sectarian liberalism, democracy and Hungary’s place

Hungary and Prime Minister Orbán have been being attacked for its “illiberalism” recently. Even President Obama has made a  quite hostile remark about Hungary:

From Russia to China to Venezuela, you are seeing relentless crackdowns, vilifying legitimate dissent as subversive. In places like Azerbaijan, laws make it incredibly difficult for NGOs even to operate. From Hungary to Egypt, endless regulations and overt intimidation increasingly target civil society

And Obama has let the (poor) cat out of the bag in the same speech. This sentence speaks for itself:

I believe America’s support for civil society [in foreign countries] is a matter of national security [for the USA].

Can they?

In case somebody didn’t know,  Obama included Hungary in that list  because of the  Norway Civil Fund … which is not so Norwegian after all. For more details about this matter, see my earlier post  titled Epic fail.

No doubt the current USA leadership  really wants their “liberal” stooges back in power, the postcommies who call themselves  “democratic opposition”.  Since Fidesz has been supported by about half of the decided Hungarian voters  for quite a while, and the five or so “democratic parties”  stand at less than 20% altogether, a “colour revolution” has got slim chances in Hungary.  After the national elections in April and the European Parliament elections in May, Fidesz is going to win its third landslide election next week on the local elections.

Anyway,  let’s see what Orbán said in a speech a few days ago, a few days before Obama’s speech.

No smaller task is ahead of us than trying to establish a new Hungarian state, independent of the taboo system of political correctness well-established in Western Europe, which would make our (national) community successful in the worldwide race.  It’s important to note that the thoughts of  Adenauer or Schuman, the great figures of Christian democracy, wouldn’t qualify politically correct in Eurospeak today. So Christian democracts must not be scared even if the high priests of the Liberal Sect demand  our excommunication louder and louder. This way they would excommunicate the great figures of Christian democracy as well from European politics.  The supporters of liberal democracy think something is either liberal democracy or it is not a democracy. They can do so only because they think what they represent is the exclusively right point of view.  That is how the majority principle gets replaced with the principle of “kizárólagosság”  and this is how the liberal and democratic principles become contradictory.  [Leto’s remark: “kizárólagosság” means “exclusivity” but “absolutism” may be  actually more appropriate in this context.]

The liberals defend themselves from the unpleasant feeling of being in the minority this way .  This may be understandable from a psychological point of view but it’s absolutely not acceptable in a dispute about principles, values and eventually in a dispute about choosing political models.

The will of the majority is something you cannot circumvent in a democracy, in a European democracy.   There are several acceptable forms of democracy. Democracy is not necessarily liberal and if something is not liberal then it may still be democracy. The liberals always want people believe one can choose only between two possibilities. One of the most important issues in the future is that we, Hungarians should avoid this dead end [Leto’s remark: that is this false dichotomy, black-and-white-thinking]. We must keep  on agenda what democracy means in Europe.  It’s imperative that we state that a political community may have other goals than realizing abstract principles and abstract trains of thoughts.  Such goals could be ensuring one’s (biological) survival and defending one’s basic beliefs.

Our politics, what we followed in the recent years, also goes against the interests of political groups which are built on the taboo system of political correctness. So they are not  choosey  with the tools and methods they employ.  If you don’t accept today’s monopolistic liberal value system then you’ll be a supporter of dictatorship and they will mention you together with China, Russia or Singapore. Of course they themselves know their claim is false since Hungary is an inseparable part of the West. Even Communism and the Soviet Union couldn’t uproot us from there. This is why we are a member of the European Union and NATO, too.

 

Hungary’s left liberal elite and the West

I came across with an excellent writing by George Schöpflin:
the Budapest elite looks down on the countryside and patronises the centre-right as ignorant hicks. This does not go down well.
This approach, which has deep roots in the Hungarian past, is strongly universalist (quondam internationalist) and will not or cannot understand how the great majority in Hungary accepts its Hungarian identity and objects to its being disrespected. Consequently, the left-liberal elite not only has to confront a shrinking voter base, but actually appears to revel in it and to insist on the absolute correctness of what it says by constant reference to “the West”.  This “West” however is an imaginary construct (to misuse Benedict Anderson’s language) that serves only to legitimise the left-liberal elite’s claim to power, the power that is to set the agenda and pass moral judgement. It’s an odd kind of opposition that is constantly running abroad for its support base, is increasingly cut off from the social and cultural realities of its own society, lives in an epistemological bubble and betrays its purported intellectual heritage by refusing to engage in argument of any kind. Consequently, its cultural capital is shrinking, a haemorrhage that does not seem to perturb it in the slightest.
for reasons of their own, the international media have run a quite unbelievably vicious campaign against Hungary. Plausibly backed by a sophisticated public relations operation that plays to the journalists’ own predispositions, a thoroughly negative narrative of Hungary has been constructed and the domestic media use this to reinforce their own belief system. The left liberal elite then sees itself justified in its thinking. It’s a wonderful circular system, that has only one drawback: it doesn’t win votes.
I highly recommend reading Mr. Schöpflin’s whole article because it does explain a lot of things in Hungary’s political life, including the positions of Fidesz, Jobbik and LMP as well.
Fidesz won in each and every county

Fidesz won in each and every county

 

Fidesz won in all but in 10 constituences

Fidesz won in all but in 10 constituences

Public trust growth in government largest by far in Hungary

The global left-lib media, the left-liberals/socialists abroad and in Hungary have been, and are, crying rivers about “the collapse of democracy in Hungary”, dictatorship, what have you.

Today I’ve found some informative infographics  here from Eurobarometer which, at least for me,  doesn’t seem to confirm these evergreen charges against the Orbán government. (Leftlibs are welcome to try to explain these data away in the comment section.)

Public trust in government

Gyurcsány‘s left-liberal coalition (Hungarian Socialist Party, MSZP and Alliance of Free Democrats. SZDSZ) government changed their prime minister in 2009 and Orbán‘s conservative-Christian democrat (Fidesz and KNDP) government coalition swept  into power on the 2010 elections with a supermajority (and  they kept it in 2014)

This is how much people trusted their government in the October of 2007 (before the economic crisis) throughout Europe:

Public trust in governments

October, 2007

And this is six years later:

 

Public trust

November, 2013

During the six year period 2007-2013, the biggest loss of trust in the national governments occurred in Spain (a whopping 40 percent decrease) and the biggest gain occurred in Hungary (a ten percent increase).

It’s edifying, isn’t it?

 

Political cowardice or wisdom?

The new monument dedicated to the memory of all victims of Hungary’s occupation by Nazi Germany in 1944, next to the Soviet monument in front of the US embassy which commemorates Hungary’s Soviet occupation in 1945 was yesterday finished… There has been an ongoing hysteria campaign against it for months, with global media support, and its completion (originally scheduled on March the 19th, the day of the Nazi occupation)  has been delayed several times.  Today the government has announced that ,with regard to the ongoing postcommunist (“left liberal”)/Jewish hysteria campaign, the monument will not be unveiled.   The  scum, a few dozen activists of MSZP, Bajnai’s and Gyurcsány‘s parties and some “independent” Holocaust-industry workers, which gathered yesterday to demonstrate against the monument threw eggs and yoghurt at the monument.

 

 

I understand the government wants to avoid unnecessary confrontations but   I’m deeply disappointed. This bad  compromise shouldn’t have been made.  The government shouldn’t have given in to these bullies.    They should have called for people’s support. I’m pretty sure a 100+ thousand strong crowd would have gathered easily even in this unbearably hot weather to unveil the monument. (It’s over 30 C here now).

HUNGARY: WHY THE FORCES OF DARKNESS ARE DESPERATE TO CONTROL VIKTOR ORBAN

And this old post must be read, too. It was written on the 18th of January, 2012, five days before hundreds of thousands Hungarians took to the streets of Budapest in freezing cold in defense of the Orbán-government.
PM Orbán later said several times this huge rally prevented EU/IMF from doing to what Hungary what they did in Italy and Greece, that is replacing their democratically elected prime ministers with their stooges.

 

The pro-Orbán rally on the 23rd of January, 2012

The Slog.

Orban…bad guy who may do some good?

While the media in general are paying far more attention to Greece and its determination to play by the rules and thus win back market respect, Hungarian maverick Viktor Orban takes the opposite view. He may well represent a far bigger threat to the shibboleths of our current form of capitalism.

It’s hard to be anything other than equivocal about the rumbling Hungarian crisis. On the one hand, Magyar Prime Minister Victor Orban appears to be in the same Bonkers League as Recep Erdogan, displaying as he does the familiar mix of controlling political power-grabs, while pursuing economic policies best described as All over the Place. But on the other hand, Orban was elected with an overwhelming majority, he inherited most of the fiscal problems from the previous deficit-obsessed New Labour-style government (Peter Mandelson had quite a few ‘friends’ in it), and…

View original post 1,445 more words

Orbán press conference after no vote to Juncker

British PM David Cameron and Hungarian PM Viktor Orbán voted ‘no’ for Jean-Claude Juncker  as European Committee chairman.  Cameron requested the voting procedure to take place. He opposed Juncker’s presidency so vehemently that he said this would mean the UK will likely vote for leaving the EU in 2017.  First it was Orbán who announced on the 25th of May, shortly before the EP elections, that  Hungary is not going to support Juncker’s EC presidency. Besides Orbán’s support, initially Cameron also had the backing of the prime ministers of Sweden and the Netherlands.  Moreover Italy’s PM Matteo Renzi and even Germany’s Chancellor Merkel seemed to oppose Juncker. After a series of talks, eventually Merkel changed her mind, probably for internal political reasons, and Italy’s Renzi pulled out of the anti-Juncker group, too.  Sweden and the Netherlands switched sides this Wednesday and they announced their support for Juncker.

Orbán has confirmed he would vote no this morning and he said  the following after the voting:

Voting is the normal procedure  in democracies if no consensus could be reached. This is what happened today and the result was 26 votes for and two votes against.  I myself would have voted no even if I had been alone because this is a question of principle.  Hungary had to send out a clear and strong message: we are not going to agree to trespassing the boundaries of the Basic EU Treaty, even with the  laudable intention of striving for consensus.

He meant that according to the Basic Treaty the Council of Europe  European Council, that is the heads of member states, should nominate the EC chairman but now the candidate of EP election winner, the European People’s Party, the party group which Orbán’s Fidesz is an important member of, was nominated automatically.   Orbán added that if more political room, new rules are needed  then that must be proposed, discussed and then “the Basic Treaty may be modified in a transparent, democratic, well-prepared and thoughful way”.  He said it’s very wrong to reinterpret treaties and this is what happened here.  He also remarked the EU has tried to claim the right to rule on several issues which in fact belong to national competence beyond any doubt. He quoted examples like regulating utility bills, the tax Hungary levied on banks or the law on making distilled spirits (pálinka).  “This practice simply cannot be continued and we are going to defend Hungarian interests”, he added.

In addition this whole issue points well beyond our own interests and beyond the interests of the European People’s Party, too.  In fact I did not vote against one particular person. I voted for changing this established political practice.

Answering a question how Fidesz MEPs will vote in the European Parliament, he said he’s got a very firm opinion but that voting will be a secret ballot.

Orbán answered questions after the voting

He also spoke about that the Hungarian approach won in a few issues concerning the EU strategic policies for the next five years. For example, the previously much attacked economic policy of Hungary that taxes on labour must be decreased has been accepted. He also saw some progress about Hungary’s method of achieving low energy prices via market regulations. He stressed that market regulation is not a goal in itself and  market forces must compete so that the consumers would enjoy better and better quality and lower and lower prices. However in his opinion this principle doesn’t always work and that’s clearly the case in the energy supply market where monopolies are inevitable.

He said that there seems to be some kind of progress in the question of migration, too.

The EU must make it very clear that migration (into EU) must be stopped, that’s the Hungarian stance.  We don’t regard migration a process to be managed, something controllable.

He admitted “the closing statement of the EU summit doesn’t state this so bluntly but it does contain a passage that EU must manage migration much better than so far”.

Finally he said that most of the debates, between the Northern and Southern countries,  were about making the rigid monetary and fiscal rules of EU more flexible.  Orbán said that he stayed out of these debates because  Hungary has treaded her own path in these questions in the recent years.

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