The World Congress of Families in Budapest

This morning Prime Minister Viktor Orbán has opened the Budapest Demographic Forum/Budapest Family Summit which is now being held under the auspices of the global World Congress of Families.  WCF  is an annual congress which is dedicated to families (as meant by normal, decent people or as it is defined in Hungary’s Constitution:  a life union of exactly one man and exactly one woman and their children!) and it’s an important forum for conservatives throughout the world.

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Incidentally, on this occasion, George Soros’ CEU university, which (unfortunately) the last couple of posts of mine were about, didn’t miss either to promote their sick left-liberal views:

The Central Eastern European region is quickly becoming a key player in the support of regional anti-gender movements and global right-wing politics. For example, the World Congress of Families and the International Organization for the Family, a large coalition of conservative organizations from around the globe, will host their annual conference in Budapest in late May under the theme “Building Family-Friendly Nations: Making Families Great Again.” Such developments require serious academic engagement and persistent multidisciplinary discussion.

With our invited guests we will review the gendered and hetero-normative aspects of right-wing discourses on the family, the root causes of such discourses and policies, and their consequences for LGBTQ rights and reproductive justice. The panel will provide an overview of the geopolitical stakes in focusing on particular formations of the family, as well as on the support for LGBTQ equality and reproductive justice in the post-Cold War world order. We will take a closer look at the Hungarian context and the role of discourses on the family in local and regional politics. This discussion between scholars and activists offers an intersectional perspective on gendered discourses and politics in light of the globalized right-wing movements.

Anyway, here are the major points PM Orbán made in his opening speech:

  • Europe is losing big time concerning the reproduction of her population. There are two approaches to solve this existential crisis: immigration and  supporting families … which is the Central European way.
  • Orbán said that his government is strongly committed to solving  Hungary’s demographic crisis by supporting Hungarian families instead of supporting mass immigration from the Middle East and Africa, which is still the preferred “solution” in Western and Northern Europe.
  • Hungary has succeeded in stopping the illegal mass immigration at her Southern borders.  “If that’s possible at all, Hungary will more even more resolute to defend her borders, regardless of any EU disapproval”, said Orbán.
  • Hungary lost about a million people in the last few decades and that’s more than our loss in WWII.  There were 10,8 million people living in Hungary in 1980 and now there are only 9.8 million.
  • Hungary’s fertility rate (the average number of children per woman) now stands at 1.5.  Orbán pledged that his government will increase the fertility rate to the level which is necessary to replenish the population, that is to 2.1, by 2030.
  • He announced a number of pro-family measures for 2018.  He also emphasized that Hungary’s subsequent governments must also exhibit this kind of supportive attitude for families.

The announced measures are the following:

  1. More family tax breaks, focussed on two-child families.
  2. 50% of the student loan will be paid by the government for those women who have student loans.  The student loan will be paid off entirely by the government for those women who have three or more children!
  3. Child care support will be provided for an additional year for women with degrees in higher education. Student mothers will be provided with this benefit until their child is two year old.
  4.  The Hungarian families with mortgages will be paid one million Forints (3250 EUR/2820 GBP/3660 USD) for their third child and one million Forints for each one after.
  5. The government initiates a “huge programme” to build, or to renovate, crèches (day care centres)
  6. Soon the Hungarian families living abroad may also have access to Hungary’s “baby bonds”. (This is a type of treasury bond with the objective of stimulating savings for children by their parents. Parents must make small monthly contributions and, in return, the child receives a guaranteed minimum amount tax-free upon turning 18.)
  7.   The government establishes a “family studies” think-tank which PM Orbán expects to become of international fame.

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Orbán’s response to the EU

As most of my readers will know, the hysteria about George Soros CEU university is still going on and PM Orbán visited Brussels this week twice.  Please listen to his Wednesday speech in the European Parliament here:

Unfortunately I don’t know about an English language video for  the press conference which Orbán gave in Brussels later on Wednesday.  I’d say that was pretty good indeed. 🙂
After EC president Jean-Claude Juncker had official talks (!) with George Soros in the building of the European Commission on Thursday, obviously to pull strings against Hungary, PM  Orbán attended the meeting  of the European People’s Party, which his Fidesz party is a member of, and the EU summit on Brexit on Saturday.  There wasn’t really much new compared to what you may gleam from the above video.
By “popular demand” (from my Twitter followers), I’ll translate the official press release which summarized his stance at the end of the day. I haven’t seen an English version yet.
Hungary’s prime minister has stated on the executive meeting of the European People’s Party that Hungary’s government is open to cooperation with the European Commission in every unresolved legal issues.
As  we did in the past, we intend to settle the infringement procedures against Hungary via agreements. Hungary’s prime minister has clarified again that the Hungarian government is not adamant about closing George Soros’ Central University in Budapest. However no university may enjoy privileges. Hungarian laws apply to everybody. Higher education institutions, which don’t provide actual education and operate as off-shore mailboxes,  will not be allowed by the Hungarian laws in the future either.
Hungary’s prime minister has clarified that the National Consultation launched by the government is not against Europe. On the contrary, its purpose is to reform the European Union which malfunctions in many respects at the moment and it needs renewal.
The prime minister asked help from the European People’s Party so that the energy union proposal of  the European Commission, which would substantially increase the energy bills of the Hungarian families, should be withdrawn.
Concerning the issue of migration,  he stressed that Hungary is unable to accept the illegal migrants’ unchecked immigration  and the Hungarian government is going to keep the border fence, which defends Hungary and Europe, under any circumstances.
Bertalan Havasi
Manager for the Prime Minister’s Press Office

Hope this helps to clarify the situation.  The global mainstream media is busy posting fake news like “Hungary’s Orbán accepts EU demands”….

Obama proudly meddles in Hungarian domestic politics again

Today’s news is that President Obama said at the Israeli Embassy in Washington DC that

 

when a statue of an anti-Semitic leader from World War II was planned in Hungary, we led the charge to convince their government to reverse course.  This was not a side note to our relations with Hungary, this was central to maintaining a good relationship with the United States, and we let them know.

Yes, the president of mighty 320 million-strong superpower USA has boasted that he personally arm-twisted the prime minister of a small 10 million-strong Central European country so that a rural Hungarian city of 100,000 people shouldn’t erect a statue for a most eminent Hungarian historian and numismatics expert who was also a minister during WWII and who co-signed some anti-Jewish document with other legislators.  No, the statue wasn’t a Hungarian government project but it was Prime Minister Viktor Orbán whom President Obama proudly arm-twisted so that he should pressurize the self-government of Székesfehérvár in order to cancel the plans for the statue.  Yes, Obama has won.

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Bálint Hóman, an eminent Hungarian historian and a Minister of Education and Culture during WWII

 

This is the world we live in. It’s pretty much like in the days of the Soviet Union.

 

Orbán on sectarian liberalism, democracy and Hungary’s place

Hungary and Prime Minister Orbán have been being attacked for its “illiberalism” recently. Even President Obama has made a  quite hostile remark about Hungary:

From Russia to China to Venezuela, you are seeing relentless crackdowns, vilifying legitimate dissent as subversive. In places like Azerbaijan, laws make it incredibly difficult for NGOs even to operate. From Hungary to Egypt, endless regulations and overt intimidation increasingly target civil society

And Obama has let the (poor) cat out of the bag in the same speech. This sentence speaks for itself:

I believe America’s support for civil society [in foreign countries] is a matter of national security [for the USA].

Can they?

In case somebody didn’t know,  Obama included Hungary in that list  because of the  Norway Civil Fund … which is not so Norwegian after all. For more details about this matter, see my earlier post  titled Epic fail.

No doubt the current USA leadership  really wants their “liberal” stooges back in power, the postcommies who call themselves  “democratic opposition”.  Since Fidesz has been supported by about half of the decided Hungarian voters  for quite a while, and the five or so “democratic parties”  stand at less than 20% altogether, a “colour revolution” has got slim chances in Hungary.  After the national elections in April and the European Parliament elections in May, Fidesz is going to win its third landslide election next week on the local elections.

Anyway,  let’s see what Orbán said in a speech a few days ago, a few days before Obama’s speech.

No smaller task is ahead of us than trying to establish a new Hungarian state, independent of the taboo system of political correctness well-established in Western Europe, which would make our (national) community successful in the worldwide race.  It’s important to note that the thoughts of  Adenauer or Schuman, the great figures of Christian democracy, wouldn’t qualify politically correct in Eurospeak today. So Christian democracts must not be scared even if the high priests of the Liberal Sect demand  our excommunication louder and louder. This way they would excommunicate the great figures of Christian democracy as well from European politics.  The supporters of liberal democracy think something is either liberal democracy or it is not a democracy. They can do so only because they think what they represent is the exclusively right point of view.  That is how the majority principle gets replaced with the principle of “kizárólagosság”  and this is how the liberal and democratic principles become contradictory.  [Leto’s remark: “kizárólagosság” means “exclusivity” but “absolutism” may be  actually more appropriate in this context.]

The liberals defend themselves from the unpleasant feeling of being in the minority this way .  This may be understandable from a psychological point of view but it’s absolutely not acceptable in a dispute about principles, values and eventually in a dispute about choosing political models.

The will of the majority is something you cannot circumvent in a democracy, in a European democracy.   There are several acceptable forms of democracy. Democracy is not necessarily liberal and if something is not liberal then it may still be democracy. The liberals always want people believe one can choose only between two possibilities. One of the most important issues in the future is that we, Hungarians should avoid this dead end [Leto’s remark: that is this false dichotomy, black-and-white-thinking]. We must keep  on agenda what democracy means in Europe.  It’s imperative that we state that a political community may have other goals than realizing abstract principles and abstract trains of thoughts.  Such goals could be ensuring one’s (biological) survival and defending one’s basic beliefs.

Our politics, what we followed in the recent years, also goes against the interests of political groups which are built on the taboo system of political correctness. So they are not  choosey  with the tools and methods they employ.  If you don’t accept today’s monopolistic liberal value system then you’ll be a supporter of dictatorship and they will mention you together with China, Russia or Singapore. Of course they themselves know their claim is false since Hungary is an inseparable part of the West. Even Communism and the Soviet Union couldn’t uproot us from there. This is why we are a member of the European Union and NATO, too.

 

Lies, lies, (neo)liberals…

The left-wing/left-liberals have been, and are, lying a lot about Mr. Orbán’s speech in Tusnádfürdő, Transylvania which was an attack on the neoliberal ideology indeed.  The global media presented this as if  Orbán had declared his intention to destroy democracy itself.  Let me remind everybody that (neo)liberalism doesn’t equal to democracy.   The US-based  New York Times went as far as to demand EU (!!) sanctions against Hungary in their appalling editorial.

Another typical lie is that “Orbán said that freedom is not the central element of state organisation”. In fact this is what he said:

the new state that we are constructing in Hungary is an illiberal, a non-liberal state. It does not reject the fundamental principles of liberalism such as freedom, and I could list a few more, but it does not make this ideology the central element of state organisation but instead includes a different, special, national approach.

Here’s the full speech in English if you are actually interested in what Mr. Orbán said.

Update: “Illiberális” means “non-liberal” (more exactly “liberal in  the wrong way”) in Hungarian, the language Mr. Orbán used to deliver his speech, and nothing else.  I’ve just learned that this political term was introduced in 1997 by a certain Fareed Rafiq Zakaria in the USA to mean  “fake democracy, partial democracy, Potemkin-democracy”. Apparently hardly anybody knew about this in Hungary. The translator of Orbán’s speech didn’t know  or I myself  didn’t know either (until a few minutes ago). So the correct translation of the above quote into the English language is to omit the word “illiberal”.  In fact Mr. Orbán should have said “postliberal” in that particular sentence. That fits the whole speech much better.

 

Public trust growth in government largest by far in Hungary

The global left-lib media, the left-liberals/socialists abroad and in Hungary have been, and are, crying rivers about “the collapse of democracy in Hungary”, dictatorship, what have you.

Today I’ve found some informative infographics  here from Eurobarometer which, at least for me,  doesn’t seem to confirm these evergreen charges against the Orbán government. (Leftlibs are welcome to try to explain these data away in the comment section.)

Public trust in government

Gyurcsány‘s left-liberal coalition (Hungarian Socialist Party, MSZP and Alliance of Free Democrats. SZDSZ) government changed their prime minister in 2009 and Orbán‘s conservative-Christian democrat (Fidesz and KNDP) government coalition swept  into power on the 2010 elections with a supermajority (and  they kept it in 2014)

This is how much people trusted their government in the October of 2007 (before the economic crisis) throughout Europe:

Public trust in governments

October, 2007

And this is six years later:

 

Public trust

November, 2013

During the six year period 2007-2013, the biggest loss of trust in the national governments occurred in Spain (a whopping 40 percent decrease) and the biggest gain occurred in Hungary (a ten percent increase).

It’s edifying, isn’t it?

 

HUNGARY: WHY THE FORCES OF DARKNESS ARE DESPERATE TO CONTROL VIKTOR ORBAN

And this old post must be read, too. It was written on the 18th of January, 2012, five days before hundreds of thousands Hungarians took to the streets of Budapest in freezing cold in defense of the Orbán-government.
PM Orbán later said several times this huge rally prevented EU/IMF from doing to what Hungary what they did in Italy and Greece, that is replacing their democratically elected prime ministers with their stooges.

 

The pro-Orbán rally on the 23rd of January, 2012

The Slog.

Orban…bad guy who may do some good?

While the media in general are paying far more attention to Greece and its determination to play by the rules and thus win back market respect, Hungarian maverick Viktor Orban takes the opposite view. He may well represent a far bigger threat to the shibboleths of our current form of capitalism.

It’s hard to be anything other than equivocal about the rumbling Hungarian crisis. On the one hand, Magyar Prime Minister Victor Orban appears to be in the same Bonkers League as Recep Erdogan, displaying as he does the familiar mix of controlling political power-grabs, while pursuing economic policies best described as All over the Place. But on the other hand, Orban was elected with an overwhelming majority, he inherited most of the fiscal problems from the previous deficit-obsessed New Labour-style government (Peter Mandelson had quite a few ‘friends’ in it), and…

View original post 1,445 more words

HUNGARY EXCLUSIVE BREAKING……Is the EC/US axis about to try and destabilise the dissenting Government of Viktor Orban?

I must reblog this… It’s spot on.

The Slog.

SOROS INVOLVEMENT IN DIRTY TRICKS SPELLS TROUBLE FOR HUNGARY

The Slog first posted about Viktor Orban’s outspoken Hungarian government in January 2012. Since then, Mr Orban has won a further General Election here by a very clear majority.This is called democracy.

Hungary is an EU member that wisely decided to stay out of the eurozone.

Hungarian politics are complex, but the Sun headline is this: Orban and his right wing Party are actually nationalists opposed to three things – US neoliberalist colonisation, the euro, and Brussels throwing it’s weight about. Although the Opposition in Budapest positions itself as ‘socialist’, it actually consists largely of former Soviet apparatchiks who became reborn as neoliberal fanatics soon after the USSR collapsed. But they still like the idea of rule by faceless bureaucrats: and so naturally, the EU suits them perfectly. (Think Angela Merkel)

Now think of Hungary this way: Orban is rather…

View original post 733 more words

Rumania worries over Transylvania

The Hungarian foreign ministry requested a year ago that Hungary should open two new consulates in the Transylvanian cities Nagyvárad (“Oradea” in Rumanian) and Marosvásárhely (“Targu Mures” in Rumanian) where significant Hungarian communities live. Like most of my readers must know, Transylvania (“Erdély” in Hungarian) was part of the Hungarian Kingdom from its founding in AD 1000 until the Dictat of Trianon in 1920.

 

Rumanian foreign minister Titus Corlatean‘s initial reactions about the Hungarian request were positive and he still made very positive remarks recently concerning the relations between  Hungary and Rumania.

Today it’s been revealed that Rumania has rejected Hungary’s request for opening these new consulates, without giving any explanation.

I’m particularly surprised and disappointed because the Rumanian foreign minister signalled repeatedly how gladly he would invite me to Bucharest and he would want to hold talks about improving and maintaining our relations.  I believe this act sharply contradicts his earlier sentences.

said Hungarian foreign minister Tibor Navrasics today in response.  He added that Hungary has never ever prevented other countries from opening consulates in Hungary.  He remarked that today’s Rumanian decision is going to have consequences and he has also summoned Rumania’s ambassador to Budapest immediately.

Only the traditional/historical anti-Hungarian stance of  Rumanian politics, coupled with their guilt-ridden worries over Erdély, can be  the only viable explanation for Rumania’s decision.   So much about the so-called “European thought”…

 

 

 

Orbán press conference after no vote to Juncker

British PM David Cameron and Hungarian PM Viktor Orbán voted ‘no’ for Jean-Claude Juncker  as European Committee chairman.  Cameron requested the voting procedure to take place. He opposed Juncker’s presidency so vehemently that he said this would mean the UK will likely vote for leaving the EU in 2017.  First it was Orbán who announced on the 25th of May, shortly before the EP elections, that  Hungary is not going to support Juncker’s EC presidency. Besides Orbán’s support, initially Cameron also had the backing of the prime ministers of Sweden and the Netherlands.  Moreover Italy’s PM Matteo Renzi and even Germany’s Chancellor Merkel seemed to oppose Juncker. After a series of talks, eventually Merkel changed her mind, probably for internal political reasons, and Italy’s Renzi pulled out of the anti-Juncker group, too.  Sweden and the Netherlands switched sides this Wednesday and they announced their support for Juncker.

Orbán has confirmed he would vote no this morning and he said  the following after the voting:

Voting is the normal procedure  in democracies if no consensus could be reached. This is what happened today and the result was 26 votes for and two votes against.  I myself would have voted no even if I had been alone because this is a question of principle.  Hungary had to send out a clear and strong message: we are not going to agree to trespassing the boundaries of the Basic EU Treaty, even with the  laudable intention of striving for consensus.

He meant that according to the Basic Treaty the Council of Europe  European Council, that is the heads of member states, should nominate the EC chairman but now the candidate of EP election winner, the European People’s Party, the party group which Orbán’s Fidesz is an important member of, was nominated automatically.   Orbán added that if more political room, new rules are needed  then that must be proposed, discussed and then “the Basic Treaty may be modified in a transparent, democratic, well-prepared and thoughful way”.  He said it’s very wrong to reinterpret treaties and this is what happened here.  He also remarked the EU has tried to claim the right to rule on several issues which in fact belong to national competence beyond any doubt. He quoted examples like regulating utility bills, the tax Hungary levied on banks or the law on making distilled spirits (pálinka).  “This practice simply cannot be continued and we are going to defend Hungarian interests”, he added.

In addition this whole issue points well beyond our own interests and beyond the interests of the European People’s Party, too.  In fact I did not vote against one particular person. I voted for changing this established political practice.

Answering a question how Fidesz MEPs will vote in the European Parliament, he said he’s got a very firm opinion but that voting will be a secret ballot.

Orbán answered questions after the voting

He also spoke about that the Hungarian approach won in a few issues concerning the EU strategic policies for the next five years. For example, the previously much attacked economic policy of Hungary that taxes on labour must be decreased has been accepted. He also saw some progress about Hungary’s method of achieving low energy prices via market regulations. He stressed that market regulation is not a goal in itself and  market forces must compete so that the consumers would enjoy better and better quality and lower and lower prices. However in his opinion this principle doesn’t always work and that’s clearly the case in the energy supply market where monopolies are inevitable.

He said that there seems to be some kind of progress in the question of migration, too.

The EU must make it very clear that migration (into EU) must be stopped, that’s the Hungarian stance.  We don’t regard migration a process to be managed, something controllable.

He admitted “the closing statement of the EU summit doesn’t state this so bluntly but it does contain a passage that EU must manage migration much better than so far”.

Finally he said that most of the debates, between the Northern and Southern countries,  were about making the rigid monetary and fiscal rules of EU more flexible.  Orbán said that he stayed out of these debates because  Hungary has treaded her own path in these questions in the recent years.

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