Orbán’s lecture on the 27th Summer Open University in Transylvania

Thank you for Bill Still  for the English-subtitled video. Please check out his website.

The video starts playing where, as the first (and so far only?) incumbent leader in the world, he endorsed US Presidential Candidate Donald Trump.
However it’s highly recommended to watch the lecture in full!

Lies, lies, (neo)liberals…

The left-wing/left-liberals have been, and are, lying a lot about Mr. Orbán’s speech in Tusnádfürdő, Transylvania which was an attack on the neoliberal ideology indeed.  The global media presented this as if  Orbán had declared his intention to destroy democracy itself.  Let me remind everybody that (neo)liberalism doesn’t equal to democracy.   The US-based  New York Times went as far as to demand EU (!!) sanctions against Hungary in their appalling editorial.

Another typical lie is that “Orbán said that freedom is not the central element of state organisation”. In fact this is what he said:

the new state that we are constructing in Hungary is an illiberal, a non-liberal state. It does not reject the fundamental principles of liberalism such as freedom, and I could list a few more, but it does not make this ideology the central element of state organisation but instead includes a different, special, national approach.

Here’s the full speech in English if you are actually interested in what Mr. Orbán said.

Update: “Illiberális” means “non-liberal” (more exactly “liberal in  the wrong way”) in Hungarian, the language Mr. Orbán used to deliver his speech, and nothing else.  I’ve just learned that this political term was introduced in 1997 by a certain Fareed Rafiq Zakaria in the USA to mean  “fake democracy, partial democracy, Potemkin-democracy”. Apparently hardly anybody knew about this in Hungary. The translator of Orbán’s speech didn’t know  or I myself  didn’t know either (until a few minutes ago). So the correct translation of the above quote into the English language is to omit the word “illiberal”.  In fact Mr. Orbán should have said “postliberal” in that particular sentence. That fits the whole speech much better.

 

Rumania worries over Transylvania

The Hungarian foreign ministry requested a year ago that Hungary should open two new consulates in the Transylvanian cities Nagyvárad (“Oradea” in Rumanian) and Marosvásárhely (“Targu Mures” in Rumanian) where significant Hungarian communities live. Like most of my readers must know, Transylvania (“Erdély” in Hungarian) was part of the Hungarian Kingdom from its founding in AD 1000 until the Dictat of Trianon in 1920.

 

Rumanian foreign minister Titus Corlatean‘s initial reactions about the Hungarian request were positive and he still made very positive remarks recently concerning the relations between  Hungary and Rumania.

Today it’s been revealed that Rumania has rejected Hungary’s request for opening these new consulates, without giving any explanation.

I’m particularly surprised and disappointed because the Rumanian foreign minister signalled repeatedly how gladly he would invite me to Bucharest and he would want to hold talks about improving and maintaining our relations.  I believe this act sharply contradicts his earlier sentences.

said Hungarian foreign minister Tibor Navrasics today in response.  He added that Hungary has never ever prevented other countries from opening consulates in Hungary.  He remarked that today’s Rumanian decision is going to have consequences and he has also summoned Rumania’s ambassador to Budapest immediately.

Only the traditional/historical anti-Hungarian stance of  Rumanian politics, coupled with their guilt-ridden worries over Erdély, can be  the only viable explanation for Rumania’s decision.   So much about the so-called “European thought”…

 

 

 

%d bloggers like this: