My all-time favourite football player

 

I think Pusskas should be hired for 100 million Euros.  However, keeping Suarez in mind, with good conduct claws.

August the 20th: Hungarian national holiday

It’s St. Stephen’s Day today. St. Stephen (ca. 975 – 15 August 1038) was our founding king who established the Kingdom of Hungary in AD 1000.  His feast day or nameday marks the day of the Foundation of Hungary. It’s  also “the Day of the New Bread” because  harvesting was traditionally finished on this day.

The Hungarian tribes conquered the Carpathian Basin at the end of the 9th century,  in the last wave of the Migration Period.  A feudal state had to be established or Hungarians would have disappeared like so many peoples did in the age of the  Migration Period.  St. Stephen (“Szent István”) led the country into the Christian church and established the institutions of the kingdom and the church.  He chose Western Christianity even though the Byzantine influence was much stronger in his time and it actually looked more promising than Western Christianity.  We, modern Hungarians, should thank him for that, too, because Western Christianity turned out to result in a better organized state, less corruption and less despotism.

St. Stephen’s statue in Buda Castle

The holiday is always celebrated with  lots of programs (I attended a free concert of Ghymes yesterday 🙂  ), including the oath taking of newly graduated policemen and military officers and the evening  fireworks display on the bank of the Danube in the evening, which is always attended by many people on both river banks  and is watched by many from the hills on the Buda side of the river.

Watch last year’s firework here:

Samurai sword

Eight years ago a Gypsy teenager, József Patai was stabbed very severely with a samurai sword on a bus in Budapest.  The left-liberal media started crying about racism immediately.  They wrote that “according to witnesses, a white man dressed in military uniform pierced through Patai”.  Headlines yelled “Racist attack on Roma victim”.  Politicians condemned the racist attack, dozens of articles were wailing about rising Fascism in Hungary. Left liberal groups demonstrated against racism.  Miklós  Tamás Gáspár, a former SZDSZ MP,  shouted from the rooftops that “Hungary is a racist country and he doesn’t want to live in such a country”.  BTW, he repeated that “as it’s well known, Hungary is a racist state” in a TV interview in 2011.

The victim in 2005

The police arrested the attacker a few days later .  He turned out to be a Gypsy man known as Mortimer (Mihály Gyurcsa).  This wasn’t much of a surprise to the Hungarian public though since it’s well known who wield samurai swords in the streets.

The samurai swordsman in 2005

Now I read in the news that  Bolton’s fourth most wanted one has been threatening people with a samurai sword.

A samurai swordsman in 2014

In case somebody couldn’t recognize him, his name is József Patai  and he can be seen in the very first picture, too.

Hungary’s left liberal elite and the West

I came across with an excellent writing by George Schöpflin:
the Budapest elite looks down on the countryside and patronises the centre-right as ignorant hicks. This does not go down well.
This approach, which has deep roots in the Hungarian past, is strongly universalist (quondam internationalist) and will not or cannot understand how the great majority in Hungary accepts its Hungarian identity and objects to its being disrespected. Consequently, the left-liberal elite not only has to confront a shrinking voter base, but actually appears to revel in it and to insist on the absolute correctness of what it says by constant reference to “the West”.  This “West” however is an imaginary construct (to misuse Benedict Anderson’s language) that serves only to legitimise the left-liberal elite’s claim to power, the power that is to set the agenda and pass moral judgement. It’s an odd kind of opposition that is constantly running abroad for its support base, is increasingly cut off from the social and cultural realities of its own society, lives in an epistemological bubble and betrays its purported intellectual heritage by refusing to engage in argument of any kind. Consequently, its cultural capital is shrinking, a haemorrhage that does not seem to perturb it in the slightest.
for reasons of their own, the international media have run a quite unbelievably vicious campaign against Hungary. Plausibly backed by a sophisticated public relations operation that plays to the journalists’ own predispositions, a thoroughly negative narrative of Hungary has been constructed and the domestic media use this to reinforce their own belief system. The left liberal elite then sees itself justified in its thinking. It’s a wonderful circular system, that has only one drawback: it doesn’t win votes.
I highly recommend reading Mr. Schöpflin’s whole article because it does explain a lot of things in Hungary’s political life, including the positions of Fidesz, Jobbik and LMP as well.
Fidesz won in each and every county

Fidesz won in each and every county

 

Fidesz won in all but in 10 constituences

Fidesz won in all but in 10 constituences

Lies, lies, (neo)liberals…

The left-wing/left-liberals have been, and are, lying a lot about Mr. Orbán’s speech in Tusnádfürdő, Transylvania which was an attack on the neoliberal ideology indeed.  The global media presented this as if  Orbán had declared his intention to destroy democracy itself.  Let me remind everybody that (neo)liberalism doesn’t equal to democracy.   The US-based  New York Times went as far as to demand EU (!!) sanctions against Hungary in their appalling editorial.

Another typical lie is that “Orbán said that freedom is not the central element of state organisation”. In fact this is what he said:

the new state that we are constructing in Hungary is an illiberal, a non-liberal state. It does not reject the fundamental principles of liberalism such as freedom, and I could list a few more, but it does not make this ideology the central element of state organisation but instead includes a different, special, national approach.

Here’s the full speech in English if you are actually interested in what Mr. Orbán said.

Update: “Illiberális” means “non-liberal” (more exactly “liberal in  the wrong way”) in Hungarian, the language Mr. Orbán used to deliver his speech, and nothing else.  I’ve just learned that this political term was introduced in 1997 by a certain Fareed Rafiq Zakaria in the USA to mean  “fake democracy, partial democracy, Potemkin-democracy”. Apparently hardly anybody knew about this in Hungary. The translator of Orbán’s speech didn’t know  or I myself  didn’t know either (until a few minutes ago). So the correct translation of the above quote into the English language is to omit the word “illiberal”.  In fact Mr. Orbán should have said “postliberal” in that particular sentence. That fits the whole speech much better.

 

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